Fascists symbols throughout the US government

Federal fasces iconography

Emancipation Memorial

On the podium of the Emancipation Memorial in Washington D.C., beneath Abraham Lincoln’s right hand.

The reverse of the Mercury Dime, the design used until the adoption of the current FDR dime in 1945, features a fasces.

On the obverse of the 1896 $1 Educational Series note there is a fasces leaning against the wall behind the youth.

In the Oval Office, above the door leading to the exterior walkway, and above the corresponding door on the opposite wall, which leads to the president’s private office; note: the fasces depicted have no axes, possibly because in the Roman Republic, the blade was always removed from the bundle whenever the fasces were carried inside the city, in order to symbolize the rights of citizens against arbitrary state power (see above)

Two fasces appear on either side of the flag of the United States behind the podium in the United States House of Representatives, with bronze examples replacing the previous gilded iron installments during the remodeling project of 1950.[9]

The Mace of the United States House of Representatives resembles fasces and consists of thirteen ebony rods bound together in the same fashion as the fasces, topped by a silver eagle on a globe

The official seal of the United States Senate has as one component a pair of crossed fasces

Fasces ring the base of the Statue of Freedom atop the United States Capitol building

A frieze on the facade of the United States Supreme Court building depicts the figure of a Roman centurion holding a fasces, to represent “order”[10] The National Guard uses the fasces on the seal of the National Guard Bureau, and it appears in the insignia of Regular Army officers assigned to National Guard liaison and in the insignia and unit symbols of National Guard units themselves; for instance, the regimental crest of the 71st Infantry Regiment (New York) of the New York National Guard consisted of a gold fasces set on a blue background

At the Lincoln Memorial, Lincoln’s seat of state bears the fasces—without axes—on the fronts of its arms; fasces also appear on the pylons flanking the main staircase leading into the memorial

The official seal of the United States Tax Court bears the fasces at its center

Four fasces flank the two bronze plaques on either side of the bust of Lincoln memorializing his Gettysburg Address at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

The seal of the United States Courts Administrative Office includes a fasces behind crossed quill and scroll

In the Washington Monument, there is a statue of George Washington leaning on a fasces

A fasces is a common element in US Army Military Police heraldry, most visibly on the shoulder sleeve insignia of the 18th Military Police Brigade and the 42nd Military Police Brigade

A fasces also appears shoulder sleeve insignia of the US Army Reserve Legal Command
Seated beside George Washington, a figure holds a fasces as part of The Apotheosis of Washington, a fresco mural suspended above the rotunda of the United States Capitol Building.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fasces#United_States